vbgihs (vbgihs) wrote in who_got_in,
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Philosophy Part 2

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Maryland

Anonymous

March 5 2009, 17:10:56 UTC 8 years ago

a couple of acceptances posted on tgc
I just declined my MA offer at CSU. I don't know if they have a waitlist, but hopefully it will help someone.

I also withdrew my app for Western Michigan's MA program.

Again, it's the most depressing happy thing to do...
Another note for Western Mich people. I got a reply back indicating I was accepted and they were sending out notes today. So, if you applied you will probably hear soon.

Rutgers

Anonymous

March 5 2009, 21:39:49 UTC 8 years ago

Still "No Decision" on Application Status.

Just ONE acceptance so far???

I should say, I don't look at TGC nor know how to find where people are drawing that info from.

Has anyone heard any more on Wash U??
I'm wondering the same thing. There are two acceptances on TGC. I am really hoping acceptances are not complete. The poster here sounded like his/hers was a special offer (RA rather than TA)

Re: Wash U (Seattle)

Anonymous

8 years ago

I was waitlisted at Princeton. Was anybody waitlisted at Princeton and asked to visit? I haven't been, at least not yet, but I'm trying to get an idea of whether they have a group of preferred waitlisters who they're allowing to visit, because I know Stanford, for one, had at least one waitlisted person at their open house thing.
I was waitlisted at Princeton as well and was likewise not asked to visit (the email was very terse - just two sentences). With regards to the Stanford visit, do you happen to know if Stanford invited the waitlisted person in question to visit, or if that person had asked permission from Stanford (and received it)? I only ask because I was waitlisted at Stanford and there was no mention of a visit.

Re: Princeton waitlisters offered visit?

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Princeton waitlisters offered visit?

Anonymous

8 years ago

I was reading over Schwitzgebel's comparison of the selectivity of harvard med school, harvard law school, and the harvard philosophy program (http://schwitzsplinters.blogspot.com/2007/09/applying-to-philosophy-phd-programs.html). This made me wonder whether anyone has attempted to compare (objectively, pseudo-objectively, or completely subjectively) the selectivity of grad schools across disciplines (e.g. between philosophy, english, econ, math, law, medicine, you name it). I looked, but could find no such thing. I suspect that if any such comparison were undertaken, it would be discovered that getting into a philosophy graduate program is tougher than getting into just about any other graduate program, period. For one thing, philosophy acceptance rates at the top levels are certainly much lower than those at the top law or med schools (2-3% vs. 11-12%). I'm not sure how this compares with other PhD programs, but I suspect philosophy's are lower than most. Furthermore, if we take GREs into account, philosophy majors tend to score better than almost all other disciplines, indicating that philosophy applicant pool is more qualified than most. This raises the question: would it possible to come up with an objective measure of whether the admissions process for a PhD in philosophy is more competitive than the admissions process for any other graduate program? Anyone have thoughts?
On a somewhat related note, it is often said that the admission process is very random. I think this is true for many of us, but not for all of us. For example, I know people who (like our own plnphilosopher) have been admitted to virtually all the schools they applied to, which means *several* top 10 programs. For these individuals, the process hasn't seem very random at all. Apparently their applications were just that good and that much better than everyone else's. (Of course, the high quality of their applications is probably due to their own hard work and knowing how to work the system, not to mention philosophical quality.) But my point is that I am no longer convinced that applying to grad school in philosophy is a crapshoot. One can be reasonably certain, given a certain kind of application, that she will be accepted at top schools. Now, these individuals who I know who have actually done this this year were not very certain that they would be accepted at so many top places, but that is just because they were reasonable humble and what not. For others of us, with less perfect applications, the process may very well be somewhat random (in the sense that we might get accepted at a great place and rejected at significantly worse places, etc.)...

Anonymous

March 6 2009, 04:06:49 UTC 8 years ago

philosophy is the most competitive of all

Anonymous

March 6 2009, 04:12:08 UTC 8 years ago

Maybe. But it's kind of weird, because most philosophers are so lazy (by ordinary standards of "hard work"; they are not intellectually lazy, but intellectually rigorous). You'd think most of them couldn't be bothered with applying to tons of grad schools and all that. For myself, I'll say that I'm shooting for a career as a philosopher because I'm too lazy (again, in common society's sense) to want to do anything else, so I figure this is my best bet. Maybe there are a lot of people out there like me, and this is why we're all in competition. We're all competing with each other for the best way to be lazy. Kind of funny, when you think about it.

Anonymous

8 years ago

Anonymous

8 years ago

Anonymous

8 years ago

Anonymous

8 years ago

Anonymous

8 years ago

Anonymous

8 years ago

Anonymous

8 years ago

I've got rejections back from MIT and UCSD, but have heard nothing from anyone else out of:

Harvard
NYU
Rutgers
Princeton
Columbia
Berkeley
UNC
UMD
U Arizona

Am I at the back of the queue for rejection letters (surname T) or can I hold out hope for wait listing do you think?

R.T.
Well, I've heard nothing from UNC, UMD and Berkeley (among a few others not on your list). From what I understand, it's most realistic to assume rejection if you haven't heard from them by now (I think all but Columbia have contacted people). Of course, you shouldn't make any decisions before hearing definitively from all schools you want to go to, but I'd say the chances of rejection are substantially higher than of wait-listing for most of the schools you've listed.

Re: Waitlisted or rejected?

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Waitlisted or rejected?

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Waitlisted or rejected?

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Waitlisted or rejected?

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Waitlisted or rejected?

Anonymous

8 years ago

no response to email inquiry either.
hahaha...
how frustrating.
On the grade cafe, someone (I believe a Music PhD student) posted a rejection with this note: "For all international applicants to UofT: The provincial government did not give money for international students this year because of the financial situation." Does anyone know if this is correct?! (I can't imagine any reason the OP would lie about it, but maybe it's only for Music? If it's province funding, though, that seems as if it would affect all departments, but I don't really know how that aspect works...)

At any rate, can anyone confirm or deny this? I'm now suddenly very anxious about my Toronto application. :(
Note: This was originally meant to be a response to a post on Cornell Rejections, a post that argued that offering 4 spots might be a good thing, because among other virtues, it doesn't needlessly provide hope to those people that would never procure tenure track jobs anyways. There are a number of things wrong with this sort of reasoning, among them the fact that it is a dubious conjecture that a department would spend a good amount of its resources on those it considers 'unfit, and unable'.


But Let me take a moment to try to dispel of an article of faith, in the so-called 'chosen one's' for philosophy. My friend and I expressed previously that their was a great deal of 'luck' involved in the admissions process. The process isn't random, otherwise the admissions committee would just pick names from out of a hat and get similar results, but there is a considerable amount of unpredictability when it comes to admissions; certainly more than we would like to allow. The obvious objection to this is that their are a few students, some of which are on this board (and hat's off to them I might add), get into the majority of all the schools to which they apply (even top 10 schools). But far from being 'head and shoulders' above the rest, these chosen few are far more likely to be statistical anomalies for a given application population. Given that their are probably at least 200 hundred people in the world that satisfy the following criteria (1) their applying to graduate school for philosophy within a given year (2) They have a good/great GRE score (3) They have a great GPA/Philosophy (4) they have very laudatory letters of rec (5) they have produced a decent to good writing sample on a particular philosophical topic or question (5) they apply to schools in the PGR top-10.

Within a given year the top 10 programs (let us disregard ties) I think 80 would be a generous figure to put on the amount of spots available. Given these figures, I would find it quite amazing and counter-intuitive if there weren't 5-10 people that were admitted into at least 4 top programs.

So perhaps their is the fabled neo-Kripke among us, who will publish interesting work in Nous and Phil. Review, this coming year, but I think the crude statistical considerations above are more the rule, in terms of admissions explanations, and less the exception.

It would be a lovely thing to think that someone, for one reason or another, was priveledged among the graduate population; something to be desired even if only to fan the flames of one's own intellectual vanity. Far more lovely a thing would it be for those perspectives who think, a la our 'American Dream', "if I work hard enough than I will get into anywhere". Unfortunately, like all dreams, this one has to awake to a rather different reality.

I know these comments may be contentious, so I'd like to hear back on your thoughts.

A.C.S

P.S. I should note that this is not in any way meant to take away from the joy that that accrues to receiving offers from many top programs, only to mitigate the chances of drawing an unmotivated conclusion, more information on the review of one's application and those of others notwithstanding, that one's application was, as has been said elsewhere, 'so much better than everyone else's"
P.S.S. If your application is clearly terrible, mediocre, or otherwise, the above remarks are not meant to apply.
Here is something I want to add. Although there are always a few people that will get into most every school to which they applied, there many (too many?) applicants that are highly qualified enough to make it into a top-20 program. When I say that this is a crapshoot, I say it is a crapshoot for THESE applicants because, since they possess all the qualifications, all it takes is one or two people on the admissions committee to really like the feel of their application... But, as we all know, the numbers are against them.
This, I take it, is the reasoning behind the applying to ~20 schools strategy. This is the strategy I employed, and my results seem to confirm what I have said above. I have an acceptance at a top-10 school and I am anticipating the rest to be rejections. I am only waiting on UCLA.
Who knows, maybe I am an exception. I dont think so, though.

Re: Myth and Admissions

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Myth and Admissions

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Myth and Admissions

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Myth and Admissions

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Myth and Admissions

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Myth and Admissions

Anonymous

8 years ago

"there is the fabled...", obviously. And shit, 'there' are certainly a lotta fuckin commas in that sentence. Terrible.

A.C.S

Anonymous

March 6 2009, 21:35:10 UTC 8 years ago

anyone who would only get from your insightful input that you made grammatical mistakes is ridiculous and irrelevant. no worries, pal.

Anonymous

8 years ago

I checked my application status via the website this morning and I now have the option to accept or decline an offer of admission.
Congrats! The same sort of thing happened to me for another school, and it took a few anxiety-laden days for the department to contact me. Hang in there or shoot them an email!

Re: I think I'm accepted to NIU

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: I think I'm accepted to NIU

Anonymous

8 years ago

Ugh...this is killing me. I Wish Chicago would just rip the bandaid off quickly, this is torture.

Wondering if my postal service is just slow...I live in Florida.
I live in hyde park, across the street from the university, and I've heard nothing.
Got the minus email from Sayre-McCord just a little bit ago.
me too. Nice email, but still a let-down.

Re: Out at UNC

techmo1ogy

8 years ago

Re: Out at UNC

Anonymous

8 years ago

March 15

Anonymous

March 6 2009, 15:09:00 UTC 8 years ago

I believe that departments' have March 15 as an at least unofficial deadline for making initial offers. This is in order to give us a month in which to make our choice, before our April 15 deadline. Has anyone else heard this? If this is right, next week should be very busy.
Just got a ding email:

Thank you for applying to our Graduate School for the 2009-2010 academic year. While I assure you that the materials you submitted were carefully reviewed by the faculty in the Department of Philosophy and by the Graduate School , I regret to inform you that the department did not recommend your admission for the coming year.

The number of places available at Princeton for entering graduate students is extremely limited and we cannot offer admission to all who are well-qualified. Indeed, many departments consistently have applicants who would be admitted without hesitation if the resources were available. Our decisions take into account not only the applicants’ merits, but also the suitability of the department’s programs to the candidates’ expressed interests. Our goal is to achieve a sound match between the strengths of our programs and the interests of the relatively small number of outstanding students that can be accommodated.

We chose to advise you of our decision via email on the assumption that a timely response would outweigh the informality of this means of communication. I would be happy to provide a formal letter upon request.

I wish you success in your plans for graduate study and thank you for considering Princeton University .

Sincerely,

William B. Russel
Dean of the Graduate School
yup. same here. First rejection that I've found disappointing. I starting to wonder if it has to do with the fact that I spent very little time on my SOP for each school because, quite frankly, I was low on time as it is. But perhaps our SOP is given more evaluation than I previously thought. Neways, this brings me offically to 2-3. Haven't had any good news in a while.

A.C.S

Re: Out at princeton

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Out at princeton

Anonymous

8 years ago

Someone posted being waitlisted via email at Rutgers on the grad cafe. It just went up some time within the last hour or so.
this was me. what do you think the chances are they'll make any offers from the wait-list?

Re: Rutgers waitlist posted on Grad Cafe

Anonymous

8 years ago

Re: Rutgers waitlist posted on Grad Cafe

Anonymous

8 years ago

CUNY

Anonymous

March 6 2009, 15:56:54 UTC 8 years ago

who has news on CUNY?
It is with the utmost regret that I type this, but I probably am a Rutgers Reject. I got off the phone with M. Diaz a while ago and it seems (as evidenced on some posts) that they have sent out accepts a little earlier in the week. It seems that they are still doing stuff--contacting waitlisters and stuff--but those activities are not acceptances, and therefore a little the less to be desired. In any case, an imminent rejection e-mail from them would is very hurtful to me, perhaps because I unwisely thought that if I get into any top school, it will be Rutgers--I know a couple of professors there from the summer institute, and though some of their language people do things that I haven't donated my time to, take E. Lepore for example, it 'get's in my chest'. It is great in New Brunswick, and it seemed like a great place to go to school--that is evidenced by the fact that they made 12 offers about 4 years ago, and all accepted (much to Rutgers' chagrin--they only wanted 8 to accept). I don't know, but I'll be feeling this one for a while. For a long while. But in the final analysis, I am better off than some, worse of than others, but all and all I will go some place where can learn a great deal.

My best and luck to all who applied to Rutgers and elsewhere.

Off to work,

A.C.S
If memory serves me correctly, you are doing way better than 99 percent of us.

So, keep up the good work and hold your head up high. You have a lot to be proud of.

Re: Rutgers Reject (Probably)

Anonymous

8 years ago

Got the email with funded offer from Fitzpatrick. I'll be turning it down shortly.

Re: In at Virginia Tech (MA)

Anonymous

8 years ago

This has been a bonding experience. I'll miss you guys.
aww... don't fret. I'm sure we'll infest the department you ultimately choose. :)

Columbia

Anonymous

March 6 2009, 17:10:33 UTC 8 years ago

Acceptances for 08 seem to have gone out exactly one year ago today.
at least, I think that's what they're gonna say. Nothing yet.
Huh, my offer says I get $50 for each backrub I let them give me...
i called the offices of all three. columbia and ucla decisions within a week (definitely not today). the person at harvard said acceptances were notified by phone already (a bit weird since there's no acceptance by phone on gc).
Definitely not today??... ugh. I was hoping to finish this bullshit today.

Re: columbia, ucla, and harvard

Anonymous

8 years ago