philosophygrad (philosophygrad) wrote in who_got_in,
philosophygrad
philosophygrad
who_got_in

Philosophy 2010

This is for anyone applying to Philosophy graduate programs during the 2009-2010 academic year. Please share acceptances, rejections, wait-list notifications, and so on.

Best of luck to everyone applying!
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I've posted a few times anonymously, but since I plan to participate through the spring, I thought I should make a proper introduction.

BA in history. Overall GPA = 3.75; philosophy GPA (such as it was) = 4.0.
MA'ing in philosophy. GPA is 4.0.

GRE: 800/800/5.5

LORs: 3 (what I believe are) good letters

Sample: general phil. science

Interests: mind, science (esp. biology)

Schools: Harvard, MIT, NYU, Columbia, Rutgers, Princeton, CUNY, UWisc, UMich, UCSD, Pitt HPS, UC Berkeley (or so I thought...)

That's all for now.
So you thought?

CUNY

Anonymous

7 years ago

Re: CUNY

i_like_to_walk

7 years ago

Is there any point in doing this?
I'm going to assume that you're joking? Even if you were that much of a perfectionist, the scores won't arrive on time.

Re: Retaking a 1530?

Anonymous

7 years ago

http://leiterreports.typepad.com/blog/2009/12/given-the-job-market-should-phd-programs-systematically-limit-the-number-of-new-students-they-enroll.html

That was a depressing read.
Re. Cornell, who all who is applying is submitting GRE scores?
I am not planning to submit a report. They explicitly mention that they don't look at them. I might just mention them on the application, but I am not paying $20 to have them sent.

idyllsoftheking

7 years ago

heteroptia

7 years ago

there are a number of consortia and institutional partnerships (e.g. new york inter-university doctoral consortium, Harvard/MIT, Duke/UNC) that allow grad students at one institution to take classes at another. thesis committees frequently include faculty from institutions other than the ph.d.-granting one. some programs have inter-departmental reading groups.

i'm curious what people think about the role of these factors in choosing where to apply/where to go. i'm surprised to see that these factors have been largely neglected in the who_got_in discussions every year, since it seems to me that this kind of access to faculty at other institutions could make a huge difference to a grad student.

there are at least two important questions i can think of in the area - one has to do with the degree to which students are able to access faculty at other institutions through various programs, institutional partnerships, or even informal affiliations between nearby departments? do faculty encourage or discourage participating in seminars at other institutions? do faculty treat students from other institutions differently than students from their own institutions? how common is it for students to take courses at other institutions/interact with grad students from other institutions/draw committee members from other institutions? i imagine that this might differ quite a bit depending on the departments/consortia - so i'd be curious to know what people have experienced or heard about various inter-departmental activities.

the other question is how relevant this sort of access is to making decisions about where to go. conceivably, going to grad school at a school in the NY consortium could radically expand ones opportunities for coursework and advising versus going to some place (e.g. Notre Dame or University of Texas) which is geographically isolated from other strong departments. how significant a factor is access to faculty at other institutions?
I've thought of the various questions you raised- about how well these consortia *actually* work out- and decided the best way to get information about it would be from current grad students, during visits.

But, for what it's worth, some students have outside committee members who are from geographically distant, non-consortia schools. I don't want to name any of them, but if you go looking through grad students CVs, you will definitely find a few.

Is there always this much drama involved in getting letters of recommendation?

I sent all my recommenders a list of the addresses to which to send the letters, but not one of them has responded back to let me know that they're writing it and on the ball. Do I just assume that they know what they're doing and will write said letters in enough time for them to arrive by the due dates (which I gave them) or should I be more aggressive?

I tried to go in today to see them and find out how its going, but I only ran into one of 'em, and before I could ask him, his phone rang, and he said, "I'm sorry, but I have to go stop something" and literally ran off.
I would recommend reminding them about once a week. More aggression than that isn't warranted because PhD programs are tolerant about late LORs.
I posted anonymously a few times, but now that this thread's getting a bit busier, I figured I'd go ahead and register.

So. About me.

GPA: Technically, it's a 3.2, but my alma mater de-emphasizes grades in favor of narrative evaluations and has no grade inflation (...only about 10-20% graduate with a 3.5 or higher), so it's hard to tell what this means exactly. I guess I'll find out in a few months...? Philosophy/history of math and science major at a small, but generally well-regarded liberal arts school.

GRE Scores: 600V, 690Q, 5. Not completely horrible, but nothing special either.

Letters of recommendation: 3 from professors I've worked fairly closely with. The chair of my senior oral committee is writing an extra letter for three of my "reach" schools, as well.

Writing sample: Edited version of my senior thesis on Kierkegaard's Either/Or, which focuses on his application of Hegelian aesthetics to Mozart's operas.

Research Interests: 19th Century Philosophy (esp. Hegel and Kierkegaard), phenomenology (esp. Merleau-Ponty), various tiny-yet-fascinating subfields which vary from school to school (philosophy of music, philosophy of cog. sci., post-continental philosophy, etc.)

I'm applying to:

Ph.D.: U of Chicago, Emory, Columbia, DePaul, Indiana, U of Oregon, U of New Mexico

M.A.: U of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Georgia State

Hopefully, at least one of these places will accept me with decent funding. If not, I might look into local M.A. programs - whatever it takes to study philosophy at the graduate level next year.
Hopefully we both get into Indiana and you can teach me about Merleau-Ponty ;). My primary area of interest is cog sci, and I've only recently become aware of his relevance...

Re: Greetings.

pure_becoming

7 years ago

Re: Greetings.

heteroptia

7 years ago

Re: Greetings.

pure_becoming

7 years ago

How did you submit your cv? There's one slot for the statement of purpose, three for transcripts, and only one for either the writing sample or cv.
Combining them into one doc with a header page is an easy option, but introduces the interesting problems of exceeding 20 pages and the instructions on their site referring to a printed writing sample. hmm..

Re: Harvard on-line application

Anonymous

7 years ago

a truly soul-destroying process. i'm left wondering why anyone (me included) would be so masochistic as to submit to the vagaries of the grad application system just to have an outside chance at having an outside chance at landing a job at a community college. how far can the "philosophy for its own sake" argument go...
It goes all the way for me. The only guarantee I need going into a ph.d program is the guarantee that I'm going to get to do philosophy every day while I'm there. If I can't get a job when I get out, I'll be a really well-educated bar-tender, and I accept that.

Maybe the take-home lesson from this debate is that, if the intrinsic value of philosophy isn't sufficient motivation for you to pursue a graduate degree, you shouldn't pursue it.

Anonymous

December 19 2009, 20:31:41 UTC 7 years ago

http://schwitzsplinters.blogspot.com/2007/10/applying-to-philosophy-phd-programs_16.html

Schwitzgebel: "At UCR I'd say below 1250 is a strike against an applicant, above 1400 is a bonus."

Any ideas as to the generalizability of this? Is it just particular to UCR? Maybe it's more or less true of leiterrific programs below a certain ranking (range of rankings) and not so above that ranking (range of rankings) b/c everyone who is applying to those programs pretty much has over a 1400?

Just trying to get a more precise idea of the extent to which my good GRE score (800 Q; 680 V) will give me any kind of an edge. If you subscribe to the gist of what we're told about the importance of GRE scores, there really is no importance. But this can't be absolutely true; so I'm trying to get more of an idea of the extent to which it's not.

Anonymous

December 19 2009, 22:11:28 UTC 7 years ago

My impression was to get 1400+ so as not to get thrown out immediately, but that in general it didn't get you in, either.

Anonymous

7 years ago

Anonymous

7 years ago

Anonymous

7 years ago

I posted this a while ago, but now that more people are using this forum I thought I'd try again.
How are people handing Oxford's somewhat idiosyncratic writing sample requirements? They say they want two shorter papers, but I'd much rather send the same sample I've sent everywhere else, for a variety of reasons.
Are any of you experiencing the problem of having page numbers or footnotes in a word document (your writing sample, e.g.) become strange symbols when submitted to online apps, which convert them into PDFs? What do I do about such things? That is, what would you do/have you done about this?

Download Open Office. It'll open any text format. Get your sample how you want it with that program and then use the built-in PDF converter. Then, you can just review and submit your own PDF without having to worry about funky conversion problems with the application converters.

Anyhow, that's what I've been doing.

Re: Odd word to pdf issues

Anonymous

7 years ago

This is a question for any of you who have had the misfortune of going through the process I'm about to go through. Anyway, I seem to remember last year when I applied that several places said something about having a lower free for reapplicants. But for some reason I'm not seeing that this year. Am I having false memories(wishful thinking) or am I just not looking in the right places?

Also, when reapplying to a school do you need to resend transcripts and GRE scores? I know I should have figured this stuff out on my own but I'm getting a late start and was just wondering if anyone could provide some assistance.

Thanks
I believe it is safe to assume that the answer to your question is: whichever option costs the most.

Re: Re-applying

Anonymous

7 years ago

Pittsburgh
Rutgers
UC-Irvine
UCSD
Maryland
Michigan
Wisconsin
Indiana
Columbia
Duke

Am I leaving out any good schools? Alternatively, are there any schools I've listed that do not belong?
Looking for philosophy only or HPS as well?

Re: Programs Strong in Phil of Science

Anonymous

7 years ago

Re: Programs Strong in Phil of Science

Anonymous

7 years ago

I had a nightmare last night that, instead of the traditional application procedure, the schools decided to just put us all on an island together and have us kill each other off until there was only an acceptable number of applicants left.

...is this more, or less soul-destroying than the actual procedure?